TULERIE

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What To Do With All That Stuff.

Companies Doing GoodViolet Gross
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Blink and summer passes by.  As of this week the unofficial end of summer is here and despite the fact summer’s damn humidity is hanging on for dear life, for New Yorkers it’s fashion week — a city-wide celebration for the fashion crowd that marks a new season.

If you’re at all like us, you’re looking at your summer wardrobe, feeling bored with what’s there and guilty for letting so many pieces go unworn but are ready for new fall styles.

As much as we preach wearing clothing for it’s entire use life, we understand that sometimes you just need a purge. Some pieces may have reached the end of their life, some are torn, permanently stained, or just don’t fit anymore so that purge is necessary. It’s a cleansing feeling and a time to hit restart. However, before you fill trash bags that you haul to Goodwill, let us give you a friendly and powerful reminder that 80% of what you donate will not be sold at said Goodwill so it will go to a landfill. Our concrete jungle alone spends over $20MM per year shipping your discarded clothing to landfills. Don’t fret, we did you a major solid by putting together better uses for those piles of unwanted goods! You’re welcome.

All textiles- For all textiles that have reached their final stage of life, send them to RewearAble. We just LOVE the people there and support the mission, which is why we Tulerie is an official partner. Aside from unwanted clothes, think sheets, towels, and shoes. They’ll take it and repurpose it. If you’re interested in sending anything to them, email us at hello@tulerie.com and we’ll send you a complementary shipping label so all you have to do is throw it in a box.

Denim - If you’re finding yourself with loads of denim, there is an urgent need for pants for refugees coming in from central america without clothes. They’re desperately seeking pants for men, women and children and can be sent here:

Jeans for the Journey

1721 B Beaumont Avenue

McAllen, Texas 78501

Dresses– because we’re all about female empowerment, we have to mention Dress for Success. Remember how confident you felt at your last interview or meeting, wearing your favorite dress? Let other women feel that good doing their power pose.

Kids stuff– those rugrats grow a hell of a lot faster than our tomatoes that are finally here. And they also lose interest in toys as quickly as you did bell sleeves. Many hospitals accept gently used toys for children in care to play with. Check with your local hospital first to make sure they do. If not, find a local shelter, who will also take bathtubs, bouncers and anything else your kiddo doesn’t need anymore.

Sports gearBig Brothers and Big Sisters is a great place to send this stuff and you know it’ll get used. 

That old phone - Wireless phones and technologies offer a lifeline for domestic violence victims in an emergency.  Send those devices to the National Network to End Domestic Violence, who has partnered with Verizon to get these phones into victims hands. You can donate at any Verizon store. 

Kitchen wares or anything else household related – Send these to Hearts and Homes for Youth, who are making sure children who have been displaced from their homes, are in foster care, or group homes have what they need to feel the comforts you feel at home. 

Brand Focus: Eileen Fisher

Companies Doing GoodViolet Gross
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Eileen Fisher didn’t jump on the sustainability bandwagon, she’s been driving it!  Mitigating the damaging effects fashion has on our environment has been at the forefront of her business, unexpectedly forging an entirely new revenue stream. 

Without a doubt, one of the culprits contributing to the 25.5 billion pounds of REUSABLE textiles thrown away each year is, gulp, trends.  Fashion brands all over the world are selling you on the idea of newness, and we’re just as guilty for falling for it.  Eileen Fisher may not be one of the contemporary brands we vie after but we can certainly get behind her ethos of creating timeless, high quality pieces that will carry you from season to season and wish some of her junior counterparts in the industry followed in her lead. 

The Eileen Fisher company has two arms of sustainability, Design Work and Renew which allow the company to circumvent almost all waste.  Through the Renew initiative, customers have the opportunity to sell back there unwanted Eileen Fisher garments to the company for $5 a piece. You read that correctly, Eileen Fisher is paying their customers.  Over 4,000 pieces arrive at the company’s factory every week, validating that consumers are looking for options besides le garbage. 

The items are thoroughly inspected and either designated unsalvageable or re-sewn.  The re-sewn pieces are then used to make entirely new garments, or repaired and resold at reduced pricing. How’s that for responsible business practices (cough, cough, Burberry). The Renew collection alone is a $3MM annual business. 

I bet you’re wondering what happens to the unsalvageable pile?  We were too.  The Design Work team invested in something called a felting machine, which is primarily employed by the automotive industry.  For the price of one Hermes bag this machine helps the team recycle not only the unsalvageable garments but also the tons of scraps accumulating at its factories.  From this one ethical, non-profit driven decision the company carved out a new business in home goods.  Design Work uses the new recycled textiles to create large-scale works of wall art, accessories, upholstery pillows and other home furnishings.  The pillows are now sold ABC Carpet & Home while the wall works have been commissioned by private collectors, hotels, office buildings, museums and other corporate institutions. 

The next time you see an Eileen Fisher store, remember that she is the OG trend setter of sustainability.   

Let's make World Environment Day more important than National Donut Day

PollutionViolet Gross
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National Donut Day was last Friday.  We saw you eat that toasted coconut thanks to your Instagram.  And with National Rosé Day being Saturday, we know your Domaines Ott is chilled. But today is World Environment Day, easily more noteworthy than donuts and rosé, so we hope you'll craft a post equally as time consuming as that glass of rosé aligned perfectly with the sunset.  Bring awareness to something more important than Rosé All Day.  In honor of Wold Environment Day, we've compiled a list of 9 super simple changes you can make in your daily routine that will actually save the planet, which we believe is worthy of a reward donut.  The call to action this year is "Beat Plastic Pollution" which is one of the greatest environmental challenges of our time. 

First, look around you and count everything made of plastic that's within arms reach - and don't forget to include the pieces of your outfit made of polyester. Now let's consider why we use so much plastic if it's so harmful.  Why not just stop making things out of it, right? Two words - cheap and easy. Plastic is a cheap, lightweight material to buy and it's easy to make.  What most people don't know is that plastic is actually a valuable resource, but only when it's reused and recycled. Rather, with our growing on-demand culture, we have become reliant on plastics as disposable material.  When plastics aren't re-used or recycled it sees two fates; it is either burned in a landfill or is floating in our oceans. In fact, about 13 million tons of plastic end up in our oceans every year.

How does this effect you? When plastic ends up in a landfill, it's incinerated and all those toxins are released into the air for us to breathe. Styrofoam being one of the worst plastics because of its genetic make up of nasty, carcinogenic toxins. Ugh! When plastics make it to the ocean, lots of sh*t goes down. The material is often ingested by marine life, which is how those gross toxic chemicals enter our own food chain. I don't think this is what Elton John meant when he wrote the "Circle of Life" but I've been wrong before. Then there are plastic bags which often block waterways, exacerbating natural disasters and clogging sewers, creating breeding grounds for mosquitos and pests, increasing the transmission of vector-borne illnesses.  Hello Zika.  Bet you never thought your beach travel plans could be ruined over your Starbucks straw.  Now consider the economic impact from cleaning to keep these problems at bay (pun intended). Studies suggest that the total economic damage to the world's marine ecosystem caused by plastic amounts to at least $13 billion every year. 

One of the biggest contributors of plastic waste is single-use items, meaning it is designed to be thrown away after being used only once (like that sushi you had delivered to your apartment last night).  The most prolific single-use plastics found in the environment are, in order of magnitude, cigarette butts, plastic drinking bottles and caps, food wrappers, plastic grocery bags, plastic lids, straws and stirrers, other types of plastic bags and foam take-away containers.  This is where you should focus on reducing your footprint.  The good news here is that single-use plastics is an area where individuals can effect real change by conducting simple daily habits.

Here are a few simple ways to effectively use less plastic and 2 for how to use plastic the right way:

1.  Carry a reusable water bottle.  We are obsessed with these.

2. Take a reusable bag to the grocery store.  This makes us feel less guilty about that last Lululemon purchase.  Those bags can hold several pounds of produce!

3. Speaking of produce - when grocery shopping why put your avocados or kale in a produce bag, just to put them in another bag?  You're going to wash the leaves when you get home anyhow.  

4. Avoid plastic straws, opt for glass or paper instead.  Better yet, skip the straw and save yourself the wrinkles.

5. On the last step of your Seamless or GrubHub order, remember to check the box indicating you don't need plastic utensils.  You're at home.  You have forks. 

6. An easy one, dispose of plastics in the proper recycling containers.  Almost every fast casual restaurant is set-up for recycling, so do your part by separating the materials and putting them in the correct recycling bins. 

7. Use these glass or steel food storage containers over zip lock bags.  Your taste buds will thank you for the freshness.

8. When traveling, TSA wants you to put all your cosmetics in a plastic bag.  We suggest Glossier's reusable bag

9. Lease up? Pack up your apartment into these heavy-duty, reusable stacking containers.  They will drop them off when you need them and pick them up when you're done.  A dual approach to recycling by eliminating single-use cardboard waste and reusing valuable plastic.

Brand Focus: For Days

Companies Doing GoodViolet Gross
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We are here to tell you about a new brand, For Days, that just launched TODAY! Sadly, we are already on the waitlist, but we're hoping it's like when the hostess at Sadelle's tells you its an hour and a half wait and then calls you 30 minutes later.  Fingers crossed because WE WANT IN. For Days was launched by Kristy Caylor, recently of the ethical yet extremely stylish label Maiyet. She's taking her passion for sustainable and ethical solutions to one of the most iconic and widely used articles of clothing, the tee.  I know, ANOTHER t-shirt line. But this one is a subscription model. I know, ANOTHER subscription model. But it's so much more. For Days is the fashion industry's first-ever "closed-loop system." This is huge for the movement to sustainable and ethical practices in fashion.  For Days is revolutionary.

So what does "closed-loop" even mean? Technically, it's a system that does not exchange matter with the outside world. Open-loop (how we function today) means that a material is not recycled indefinitely and eventually becomes waste. Simply put, this t-shirt can be used over and over again and once returned is upcycled into a new tee.  It's a beautiful thing.

So this is how it works (from what we can tell on the website because like we said, we're impatiently waiting to be called):

Go to the user friendly site to add tees to your virtual drawer from a selection of colors and styles. You will have the option of ordering 3, 6, or 10 at a time which can be constantly rotated at your discretion. Next step, live in them. Don't cry over the coffee that SOMEHOW manages to find it's way to the dead center of your white tee as you're walking into work. Just go into your "drawer" and request a fresh one at anytime. All plans come with unlimited exchanges and your plan can be upgraded or downgraded at any time. After receiving a replacement tee, send that coffee stained one back in the same bag, using the prepaid shipping label.  From there For Days will break it down and make it into another shirt! Repeat when you get wine on the next one. 

According to Vogue, Caylor sees For Days as "liberating ourselves from the burden of ownership" - because even if you wear your t-shirt every day, you're really just borrowing it until you're ready to send it back.  We may be biased, but we're particularly big fans of borrowing!

You can get started now by signing up at Fordays.com. If you're not a t-shirt person (hmm, what's that like?) they plan to add non-tee styles. Regardless, you should let the concept of a closed loop system inspire you to find ways to reduce waste in your own life.

Circularity Doesn't Solve It

PollutionViolet Gross
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Circularity - the latest buzz word in the fashion world for those who want to feel like they're on the good side of eco consciousness. Circularity is the idea of reducing waste by recycling clothes. You hand over unwanted clothes and bippity-boppity-boo, new textiles are created for re-use. Our partners at RewearAble do just that and it's a necessary and important stage for responsible clothing disposal. But it’s not that simple. See the notion of circularity is solving a problem at the end of the wardrobe lifecycle, when the real problem starts WAY before you get tired of it hanging in your closet. 

It begins with the exorbitant volume of garments being produced and the cheap fabrics they are made from to sustain the low-cost and mass production. The real solution? Slowing down the cycle of fashion production and consumption.  Do you really need to buy the amazing skirt your bestie has?  NO.  Borrow it.  Should you spend your rent on a dress to wear to that big party coming up?  NO. Borrow one. 

The majority of clothing today is synthetic (plastic), which is made using fossil fuels and thanks to that, these cheap, disposable, plastic clothing (i.e. fast fashion) accounts for 76% of greenhouse gas emissions. Now let’s talk about what happens when you’re done with that $20 shirt. Pollution will invariably be created once it leaves your local salvation army to get “recycled”. But thanks to circularity, it will now get “re-used ” which really means these recycled plastic clothes will get washed and shed small plastic fibers into our rivers and oceans. And at current pace, by 2050 (only 32 years) we’ll have more plastic than fish in the ocean .

We need to take actionable steps to stop the over production of clothing and learn the difference between unwanted clothing and unwearable clothing. Thankfully we are fortunate to have options: Go old school and borrow from friends, host a clothing swap, rent something from Rent the Runway, or borrow a piece from your new Tulerie connection and help a girl make a buck in the process. Do your small part, so that when you are at dinner tonight, you will know that you're one step closer to eating more salmon than pieces of that skirt you threw away last year.