TULERIE

landfill

Even Chanel Gets Retired at Some Point

Companies Doing GoodViolet Gross
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Last week we wrote a blog post titled “What to do with all that stuff” and gave you options o’plenty to assist in your fall closet clean-out. We listed organizations who take everything from clothes, denim, and shoes, to baby gear, old phones, and household goodies. You’re welcome. But seriously, flag that email, we think it will come in handy when the weather turns and you’re scrambling to clear out space for those bulky sweaters and coats!

One of the organizations we mentioned in that email, RewearAble, is an official partner of Tulerie so we want to talk more about why we partnered with them in the first place. They also simply deserve the spotlight for the incredible work they are doing.

Tulerie is all about minimizing fashion waste but we’re realistic in that statement because we understand clothing disposal is a natural part of a wardrobe’s lifecycle. A Chanel tweed coat is basically indestructible but it won’t last forever. With that in mind, Tulerie has been committed since the onset to finding disposal solutions that have a positive impact on the environment. Little did we know our neighbors in Long Island had such a solution.

RewearAble is a local not-for-profit organization that is keeping clothing out of landfills. Where most places accept donations for resale, RewearAble accepts clothing, shoes, accessories, household textiles, toys, purses, non-breakable household goods, even rags, in any condition and prepares them for reuse or repurposing.

The best part? RewearAble was created by Adults and Children with Learning and Developmental Disabilities, Inc. (ACLD), devoted to supporting the pursuit of an enviable life for children and adults with autism, learning and other developmental disabilities. The RewearAble facilities put emphasis on hiring only people with developmental disabilities who otherwise may have a challenge finding employment. Are your eyes sweating too?

If you feel strongly about supporting your local shelter or another organization through donating goods, keep on keeping on…we trust you’ve done your diligence and those items are going to good use. If not, consider donating to RewearAble. Please email admin@tulerie.com for easy instructions on how to donate your unwanted items to RewearAble.

What To Do With All That Stuff.

Companies Doing GoodViolet Gross
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Blink and summer passes by.  As of this week the unofficial end of summer is here and despite the fact summer’s damn humidity is hanging on for dear life, for New Yorkers it’s fashion week — a city-wide celebration for the fashion crowd that marks a new season.

If you’re at all like us, you’re looking at your summer wardrobe, feeling bored with what’s there and guilty for letting so many pieces go unworn but are ready for new fall styles.

As much as we preach wearing clothing for it’s entire use life, we understand that sometimes you just need a purge. Some pieces may have reached the end of their life, some are torn, permanently stained, or just don’t fit anymore so that purge is necessary. It’s a cleansing feeling and a time to hit restart. However, before you fill trash bags that you haul to Goodwill, let us give you a friendly and powerful reminder that 80% of what you donate will not be sold at said Goodwill so it will go to a landfill. Our concrete jungle alone spends over $20MM per year shipping your discarded clothing to landfills. Don’t fret, we did you a major solid by putting together better uses for those piles of unwanted goods! You’re welcome.

All textiles- For all textiles that have reached their final stage of life, send them to RewearAble. We just LOVE the people there and support the mission, which is why we Tulerie is an official partner. Aside from unwanted clothes, think sheets, towels, and shoes. They’ll take it and repurpose it. If you’re interested in sending anything to them, email us at hello@tulerie.com and we’ll send you a complementary shipping label so all you have to do is throw it in a box.

Denim - If you’re finding yourself with loads of denim, there is an urgent need for pants for refugees coming in from central america without clothes. They’re desperately seeking pants for men, women and children and can be sent here:

Jeans for the Journey

1721 B Beaumont Avenue

McAllen, Texas 78501

Dresses– because we’re all about female empowerment, we have to mention Dress for Success. Remember how confident you felt at your last interview or meeting, wearing your favorite dress? Let other women feel that good doing their power pose.

Kids stuff– those rugrats grow a hell of a lot faster than our tomatoes that are finally here. And they also lose interest in toys as quickly as you did bell sleeves. Many hospitals accept gently used toys for children in care to play with. Check with your local hospital first to make sure they do. If not, find a local shelter, who will also take bathtubs, bouncers and anything else your kiddo doesn’t need anymore.

Sports gearBig Brothers and Big Sisters is a great place to send this stuff and you know it’ll get used. 

That old phone - Wireless phones and technologies offer a lifeline for domestic violence victims in an emergency.  Send those devices to the National Network to End Domestic Violence, who has partnered with Verizon to get these phones into victims hands. You can donate at any Verizon store. 

Kitchen wares or anything else household related – Send these to Hearts and Homes for Youth, who are making sure children who have been displaced from their homes, are in foster care, or group homes have what they need to feel the comforts you feel at home. 

The Closet Challenge

WasteViolet Gross
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Dear Lindsay

We'd like to welcome you as an honorary member of the Tulerie family.  I did a similar challenge about 6 years ago.  I decided at the start of a new year,  I would see how far in the year I could get without repeating a single article of clothing - and with no shopping.  

In no time at all it felt like literal snowballs of clothing had accumulated throughout my apartment, I nearly lost my mind.  There were alteration piles, donation piles, offer to a friend piles, resale piles, and on and on. I looked around one Saturday afternoon and felt ashamed; it was only mid-April and the finish line wasn't even in sight.  

How had I amassed so many THINGS? And more importantly, WHY?

Most of us will admit that it's often easier (and way more fun) to buy something new…no sifting through an unorganized closet or worrying whether something is clean or needs to be pressed.  And with the rise of fast fashion retailers the cost of buying new vs. wearing old is almost irrelevant as Lindsay points out, because it's likely cheaper than tonights dinner. And with the constant influx of new items, fast fashion has become an addictive drug. We fully believe in retail therapy and thankfully there are newer ways of getting that high. New outfit tonight, landfill tomorrow…Just Say No! 

To that end, this article has inspired me to take that challenge again.  I am excited to fall back in love with pieces that have collected some dust. I look forward to finding fresh ways of wearing them with pieces I've borrowed from the amazing Tulerie community. I can almost guarantee this project will result in several new listings on Tulerie from pieces I am embarrassed to say, I forgot I had.