TULERIE

fast fashion

The Closet Challenge

WasteViolet Gross
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Dear Lindsay

We'd like to welcome you as an honorary member of the Tulerie family.  I did a similar challenge about 6 years ago.  I decided at the start of a new year,  I would see how far in the year I could get without repeating a single article of clothing - and with no shopping.  

In no time at all it felt like literal snowballs of clothing had accumulated throughout my apartment, I nearly lost my mind.  There were alteration piles, donation piles, offer to a friend piles, resale piles, and on and on. I looked around one Saturday afternoon and felt ashamed; it was only mid-April and the finish line wasn't even in sight.  

How had I amassed so many THINGS? And more importantly, WHY?

Most of us will admit that it's often easier (and way more fun) to buy something new…no sifting through an unorganized closet or worrying whether something is clean or needs to be pressed.  And with the rise of fast fashion retailers the cost of buying new vs. wearing old is almost irrelevant as Lindsay points out, because it's likely cheaper than tonights dinner. And with the constant influx of new items, fast fashion has become an addictive drug. We fully believe in retail therapy and thankfully there are newer ways of getting that high. New outfit tonight, landfill tomorrow…Just Say No! 

To that end, this article has inspired me to take that challenge again.  I am excited to fall back in love with pieces that have collected some dust. I look forward to finding fresh ways of wearing them with pieces I've borrowed from the amazing Tulerie community. I can almost guarantee this project will result in several new listings on Tulerie from pieces I am embarrassed to say, I forgot I had.

Circularity Doesn't Solve It

PollutionViolet Gross
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Circularity - the latest buzz word in the fashion world for those who want to feel like they're on the good side of eco consciousness. Circularity is the idea of reducing waste by recycling clothes. You hand over unwanted clothes and bippity-boppity-boo, new textiles are created for re-use. Our partners at RewearAble do just that and it's a necessary and important stage for responsible clothing disposal. But it’s not that simple. See the notion of circularity is solving a problem at the end of the wardrobe lifecycle, when the real problem starts WAY before you get tired of it hanging in your closet. 

It begins with the exorbitant volume of garments being produced and the cheap fabrics they are made from to sustain the low-cost and mass production. The real solution? Slowing down the cycle of fashion production and consumption.  Do you really need to buy the amazing skirt your bestie has?  NO.  Borrow it.  Should you spend your rent on a dress to wear to that big party coming up?  NO. Borrow one. 

The majority of clothing today is synthetic (plastic), which is made using fossil fuels and thanks to that, these cheap, disposable, plastic clothing (i.e. fast fashion) accounts for 76% of greenhouse gas emissions. Now let’s talk about what happens when you’re done with that $20 shirt. Pollution will invariably be created once it leaves your local salvation army to get “recycled”. But thanks to circularity, it will now get “re-used ” which really means these recycled plastic clothes will get washed and shed small plastic fibers into our rivers and oceans. And at current pace, by 2050 (only 32 years) we’ll have more plastic than fish in the ocean .

We need to take actionable steps to stop the over production of clothing and learn the difference between unwanted clothing and unwearable clothing. Thankfully we are fortunate to have options: Go old school and borrow from friends, host a clothing swap, rent something from Rent the Runway, or borrow a piece from your new Tulerie connection and help a girl make a buck in the process. Do your small part, so that when you are at dinner tonight, you will know that you're one step closer to eating more salmon than pieces of that skirt you threw away last year.